Five Questions with… Rudy Wiebe

Rudy Wiebe, author of Come Back and an upcoming IFOA participant, answered our five questions!

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IFOA: Your website says that you have “always held to the fundamentals of plot, character and, above all, story.” Can you elaborate?

Rudy Wiebe: To be utterly simplistic, all human stories involve some achieving, some overcoming of something: that is, some conflict. Plot, the action sequence of that conflict, and character, the determiner and performer of that action, make up (!) the story. Obviously, a book could be written on this matter—and many have been.

© J.D. Sloan

© J.D. Sloan

IFOA: What role does spirituality play in Come Back, a novel concerned with loss and death?

Wiebe: Come Back is a story of death and memory and family. As such, matters of the human spirit play a more significant role than physical or material facts, important as the latter always are in life. The hope, the faith, the love within human spirituality are the realities that become most powerful in the lives of the novel’s characters, though they cannot, of course, experience these realities fully. At least not yet.

IFOA: Name one book that has made a lasting impression on you.

Wiebe: One (of many) would be The Fairytales of the Brothers Grimm. In my earliest grades in school, I read so many simple versions of these stories (“The Wolf and the Seven Kids,” “The Fisherman and his Wife,” “Snow White,” etc.) that when I was studying in Germany I bought the complete 1819 collection, and discovered more marvellous tales like  “The Singing Bone,” “The Messengers of Death” and many others (there are over 200). From their ultra realism to their musical magic, reading them in their original German helped me understand better that, somehow—who knows how—song and story are the foundations of human life.

Wiebe, Come BackIFOA: Finish this sentence: I write best when I…

Wiebe: …Face a specific writing problem, have considered it and gone on to do other things and return to it again, as for the first time; and then, words will find an order in my head and/or on paper that evokes a clear image of what created the problem in the first place.

IFOA: How has your writing changed over time?

Wiebe: This question is undoubtedlyly better answered by perceptive readers. As for me, I would hope my stories have grown more gently insightful, more wide-ranging in their subject matter, and, above all, more entertaining and convincing—better yet, intriguing—in their believability.

Rudy Wiebe is a novelist, short story writer and essayist. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the Governor General’s Literary Award for Fiction and the RBC Taylor Prize. Wiebe is also an Officer of the Order of Canada. See him in a round table discussion on November 2 as writers discuss real-life inspirations and the directions these inspirations have led them in.

© J.D. Sloan

Rudy Wiebe on the challenges of biography

  Rudy Wiebe is a novelist, short story writer and essayist. He has been the recipient of many awards, including the Governor General’s Literary Award for The Temptations of Big Bear. In this clip, Wiebe discusses the challenge for biographers of gathering a nuanced picture of their subjects. For him, documenting the Cree leader Big […]