Sunday, October 27, 2013 - 4:00 PM
Round table: IFOA

York Quay Centre - Studio Theatre

235 Queens Quay West
Toronto M5J 2G8
Cost: $18/$15 supporters/FREE students & youth 25 and under

Kazushige Abe and Mieko Kawakami, two prominent Japanese authors whose short stories have recently been translated into English, discuss contemporary literature in Japan. Hosted and moderated by Ted Goossen.

This event is part of Found in Translation, a yearly Festival focus on the art of literary translation with the goal of increasing Canadian awareness of international talent.


Participants

  • Kazushige Abe

    Kazushige Abe

    Kazushige Abe is the author of numerous works, including a highly acclaimed debut novella, Amerika no yoru (American Night), which won the Gunzo Prize for New Writers. He is also the recipient of the prestigious Akutagawa Prize for his novel Gurando Finare (Grand Finale). Abe presents his short story from the anthology March Was Made of Yarn, which explores the March 11, 2011 earthquake that devastated Japan, causing a ravaging 50-foot tsunami and radiation leaks from five nuclear plants. Abe is one of 22 writers who offer observations on and insight into this tragedy.

  • Ted Goossen

    Ted Goossen

    Ted Goossen teaches Japanese literature and film at York University. He is the co-editor of Monkey Business International, the general editor of The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories, and has published translations of works by Haruki Murakami, Hiromi Kawakami, Yukio Mishima and Yoko Ogawa among others.

  • Mieko Kawakami

    Mieko Kawakami

    Mieko Kawakami is a writer, poet, singer and actress. She is the recipient of the Akutagawa Prize for her novel Chichi to Ran (Breasts and Egg). Kawakami’s debut novel, Hevun (Heaven), won the Murasaki Shikibu Prize for Literature in 2010. She presents her short story from the anthology March Was Made of Yarn, which explores the March 11, 2011 earthquake that devastated Japan, causing a ravaging 50-foot tsunami and radiation leaks from five nuclear plants. Kawakami is one of 22 writers who offer observations on and insight into this tragedy, which affected many lives.