Five questions with… Liam Card

Author and screenwriter Liam Card will share Exit Papers from Paradise at IFOA.

IFOA: What are you reading right now?

Card: I just finished Kurt Vonnegut’s Bluebeard. The novel was exceptional. Yet another example of how unfairly talented the late Kurt Vonnegut was. I’m a few pages into Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel, Pygmy. I love his work as well, but this one is proving to be a little bit difficult to get into. We’ll see how it goes.

IFOA: You used to be a track and field star. What do runners and writers have in common?

Card: To begin with, they both have a tremendous amount of tenacity. When pain and frustration levels are high and the prospect of giving up seems outrageously appealing, runners and writers forge ahead and endure what is required to reach the finish line. Secondly, they both have a heaping tablespoon of focusthe ability to tune out the myriad of distractions, and the ability zero in on specific tasks, and seeing those tasks through. In track and field and in writing, in sport and in the arts, I believe these two factors to be as important as any amount of talent.

IFOA: You have written screenplays and now a novel. What’s one thing you prefer about the experience of writing a novel?

Card: Writing a novel is a dream, compared to writing a screenplay. Hands down…for me, anyway. Screenplays are highly formulaic, and certain events must take place at certain page points in your screenplay in order to follow the “tried and true” Hollywood formula of cinematic storytelling. That is all well and good, but I find it claustrophobic in contrast to writing a novel.  With a novel, the bones of good storytelling still apply. However, you have more runway to tell your tale. Simply put, a novel comes without such rigid guidelines, and there is freedom in that. After writing my screenplay, the novel was therapeutic.

IFOA: And one thing you prefer about the experience of writing a screenplay?

Card: A screenplay is a piece of art that undergoes major influence from several key people, at several points along the filmmaking assembly line. The writer gets notes from the producer. Then, the writer gets notes from the director. Then, the writer gets notes from financiers. Then, the writer gets notes from Distributors. THEN, the writer gets notes from the lead actors. So, a screenplay is a very collaborative process, which can be really interesting. That is, unless your vision for the screenplay differs drastically from one of the key people listed above. Then, it is a nightmare. Yes, I did experience a few of those along the way. But that level of collaboration was exciting…minus the nightmare conversations.

Moreover, with a screenplay there is also the magic in the sense that it will become a film. And I love films. My Dad and I have always watched films together and have bonded over several great works of art in the world of film. So, when writing a screenplay, there is something magical about the fact that someone will sit down with their father or mother or sister or brother or significant other or partner or wife or husband… or even their girlfriend or boyfriend du jour. It doesn’t matter. Just the thought of two people (or a large group of people) enjoying something artistic together at the same time is special and it makes the headaches of writing a screenplay entirely motivating.

IFOA: Finish this sentence: It really doesn’t matter if you…

Card: … are successful with your passions, but it does matter if you are proud of your attempts. NOTE: I didn’t used to believe this. When I was running track at a very high level, I couldn’t understand how or why people would train, practice, and work so insanely hard just to come fifth, or tenth, or twentieth, or last. Why bother? My association with hard work and pain was for nothing more than winning.

However, as my track coach Earl Farrell used to say, “life and the sport of track and field are incredibly humbling if you play them long enough.” As my Achilles became wracked with chronic tendonitis before the trials for the Sydney Olympics, and as my hamstring tore years later, I no longer occupied the top spot (or even the podium for that matter). I was no longer a track star or champion. Then, it clicked. My passion, in an instant, became entirely about the friendships, the process, and the ability to put yourself out there and have fun while doing it.

IFOA: Bonus question: This year’s International Festival of Authors in one word…

Card: Booktastic.  (You didn’t say I couldn’t make up a word).

Card will participate in two IFOA events: a round table October 27 and a reading October 28.

Five questions with… debut novelist Grace O’Connell

© Derek Wuenschirs

Grace O’Connell, author of Magnified World, will participate in an October 21 round table called Novelists for a New Age. She will also travel to Picton for IFOA Ontario.

IFOA: If you could meet any writer, living or dead, who would it be?

O’Connell: It’s tempting to say Fitzgerald or Hemingway, just because you know you’d have a night to remember, but I think I’d rather skip the hangover and pick the amazing Alice Munro. I’d ask her to teach me how to bake bread and write perfect stories.

IFOA: What do you and your Magnified World protagonist Maggie have in common? In what ways are you different?

O’Connell: Maggie is more selfless than I am and more patient, but she’s also more impulsive. We both live in our own heads too much. We’re both sneaky. We both like to wander the streets of Toronto on warm nights.

IFOA: If you weren’t a writer, what would you be doing?

O’Connell: Probably working in a library, daydreaming too much. I’d like to see kids discovering books they love for the first time. And I’d like being there when the library was closed and empty and quiet.

IFOA: Describe Toronto’s literary scene in three words.

O’Connell: Bright. Brilliant. Boozy.

IFOA: Finish this sentence: I wish I could…

O’Connell: Make someone laugh and cry on the same page. And fly. And cut my own hair.

IFOA: Bonus question: This year’s International Festival of Authors in one word…

O’Connell: Ferocious (it’s my favourite word, and I think it applies).

For more about O’Connell and her appearance at IFOA, click here.

Five questions with… novelist Corey Redekop

© Judd Dowhy

Corey Redekop will be at IFOA to share Husk, a novel about a struggling actor turned zombie.

IFOA: Who are you most excited to see at the Festival, and why?

Redekop: Aside from all the authors I “know” through Facebook and Twitter but haven’t yet met in person, there’s one individual I’m truly excited about (two if you count Cory Doctorow, but as we’re in the same event, I’ll just assume we’ll actually shake hands). I’m not sure if I’ll get to see him because of scheduling, but I do hope I’ll get chance to see and maybe meet China Miéville. Right now, pound for pound, Miéville’s one of the best fantasy writers on the planet, one of those rare writers able to infuse fantastical scenarios with absolutely believable characters (others being Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker). His prose is second to none, and The City and the City is one of the best fantasy thriller novels I’ve read this millennium. At heart, I am a huge geek, and while it bugs me that I’m actually older than many of the authors I geek out over, I’ll probably shriek with glee if I meet him.

IFOA: What are you reading right now?

Redekop: I typically read a few books at a time, my version of channel surfing, I suppose. I just completed Michael Tregebov’s very funny Jewish comedy The Shiva and Emily Schultz’s just so damned good The Blondes. I’m currently devouring Gemma Files’ A Tree of Bones, a great wrap-up to her Hexslinger trilogy, and I’m quite enjoying John Scalzi’s comic fantasy An Agent to the Stars. On deck, I’ve got Paul Tremblay’s Swallowing a Donkey’s Eye, Heather Jessup’s The Lightning Field, and Mark A. Rayner’s The Fridgularity.

IFOA: What’s the coolest thing about being a zombie?

Redekop: Well, you don’t need sleep, so you get a lot of work done. By “work,” I mean rampant cannibalism, but it is work, especially when your lunch refuses to sit still. Also cool? You can easily win any “how long can you hold your breath?” contests.

IFOA: We’ve heard you’ll be here for your birthday. What do you usually do on your birthday?

Redekop: Normally, I take the day off work and lounge about the house in a bathrobe or, sometimes, completely naked. Should make for an interesting round table. IFOA is a clothing optional festival, right?

IFOA: Finish this sentence: The Internet is…

Redekop: A massive timesuck, made of cats, a warning sign of the dumbing down of the world, and the greatest thing ever made.

IFOA: Bonus question: This year’s International Festival of Authors in one word…

Redekop: Eclectic.

Redekop will participate in two IFOA events: an October 25 reading and a round table called Zombies, Witches, Killers and Cowboys: Visions of the Future of the Novel on October 27.

Five questions with… poet Sandra Ridley

Ottawa-based poet Sandra Ridley was the winner of Harbourfront Centre’s 2012 Poetry NOW competition. She’ll be at IFOA to share her latest poetry collection, Post-Apothecary.

IFOA: Why do you choose to write poetry over prose?

Ridley: Poetry is the most natural form for me. I’m not a story teller at heart.

For any genre, if the writing is done well, form and content are inseparable and mutually reinforcing. I’m curious about omissions and leaps of reasoning, and the more associative and fragmentary connections between fluidities—what makes for disorienting atmospheric elements or emotive motifs—and personally, poetry seems better suited to that stylistic bent.

IFOA: What’s your idea of a perfect day?

Ridley: The kind of atemporal day when I forget who I am and what my wants and needs are. Those days don’t happen very often, of course. But they happen more often when there is sunshine involved. And a warm lake. And sand dunes.

And a couple of cold bottles of Beau’s beer.

IFOA: You grew up on a farm. How has that influenced your writing?

Ridley: I’m not sure if it has influenced my writing at all, but perhaps it has influenced my writing process. I have a very high tolerance for long stretches of alone-time. Actually, I have a love for alone-time. (I had lots of it as a child – the closest town was a hamlet of twenty-six people.)

Removing myself from involvements—necessary engagements and typical distractions—helps me focus on work. I’ve been lucky these last few years to have had a handful of weeks away each summer. I’m relatively feral by the time I come back to the city.

IFOA: If you could time travel, where and when would you go, and why?

Ridley: May 21st, 1927.

27 Rue de Fleurus, Paris.

Late afternoon, leaving Toklas and Stein’s salon just in time to see “Lucky Lindy” Lindbergh cross overhead in his single-seat, single-engine monoplane – winning the Ortieg Prize, by being the first to fly non-stop and solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

I imagine that the Roaring Twenties would be a favoured time for a lot of writers. It was a period of movement and creation—booming prosperity. Flappers and cloche hats. Motion pictures, jazz, and the Golden Age of radio. Les Années Folles. I think for many, but maybe not all, it may have been a time when people could forget the human animal’s capacity for destruction.

I would’ve been dancing and I would have had no fear of dancing.

IFOA: Finish this sentence: I write best when I’m…

Ridley: Unconcerned with my expectations for a poem. Too often I let my inner-editor nay-say too early—so the words can’t accumulate. I wish I was a little more patient with the early stages of the writing process.

IFOA: Bonus question: This year’s International Festival of Authors in one word…

Ridley: Quaquaversal! (Bet you didn’t think I’d get that one…?!)

For more about Sandra Ridley’s appearance at IFOA, click here.

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