Five questions with… poet Sandra Ridley

Ottawa-based poet Sandra Ridley was the winner of Harbourfront Centre’s 2012 Poetry NOW competition. She’ll be at IFOA to share her latest poetry collection, Post-Apothecary.

IFOA: Why do you choose to write poetry over prose?

Ridley: Poetry is the most natural form for me. I’m not a story teller at heart.

For any genre, if the writing is done well, form and content are inseparable and mutually reinforcing. I’m curious about omissions and leaps of reasoning, and the more associative and fragmentary connections between fluidities—what makes for disorienting atmospheric elements or emotive motifs—and personally, poetry seems better suited to that stylistic bent.

IFOA: What’s your idea of a perfect day?

Ridley: The kind of atemporal day when I forget who I am and what my wants and needs are. Those days don’t happen very often, of course. But they happen more often when there is sunshine involved. And a warm lake. And sand dunes.

And a couple of cold bottles of Beau’s beer.

IFOA: You grew up on a farm. How has that influenced your writing?

Ridley: I’m not sure if it has influenced my writing at all, but perhaps it has influenced my writing process. I have a very high tolerance for long stretches of alone-time. Actually, I have a love for alone-time. (I had lots of it as a child – the closest town was a hamlet of twenty-six people.)

Removing myself from involvements—necessary engagements and typical distractions—helps me focus on work. I’ve been lucky these last few years to have had a handful of weeks away each summer. I’m relatively feral by the time I come back to the city.

IFOA: If you could time travel, where and when would you go, and why?

Ridley: May 21st, 1927.

27 Rue de Fleurus, Paris.

Late afternoon, leaving Toklas and Stein’s salon just in time to see “Lucky Lindy” Lindbergh cross overhead in his single-seat, single-engine monoplane – winning the Ortieg Prize, by being the first to fly non-stop and solo across the Atlantic Ocean.

I imagine that the Roaring Twenties would be a favoured time for a lot of writers. It was a period of movement and creation—booming prosperity. Flappers and cloche hats. Motion pictures, jazz, and the Golden Age of radio. Les Années Folles. I think for many, but maybe not all, it may have been a time when people could forget the human animal’s capacity for destruction.

I would’ve been dancing and I would have had no fear of dancing.

IFOA: Finish this sentence: I write best when I’m…

Ridley: Unconcerned with my expectations for a poem. Too often I let my inner-editor nay-say too early—so the words can’t accumulate. I wish I was a little more patient with the early stages of the writing process.

IFOA: Bonus question: This year’s International Festival of Authors in one word…

Ridley: Quaquaversal! (Bet you didn’t think I’d get that one…?!)

For more about Sandra Ridley’s appearance at IFOA, click here.

Meet our bloggers

As part of our commitment to bring you great coverage of the International Festival of Authors (October 18-28), we’ve recruited four stellar bloggers to attend events and share their highlights with all of you. Without further ado, here they are!

Brianna Goldberg is a writer and producer from Toronto whose work has appeared in both of Canada’s national newspapers and on all three radio services of the CBC. She recently returned from two years of travelling through the Caribbean and Africa, where she freelanced on topics ranging from terrorism to lingerie trends to the general awesomeness of Virginia Woolf. Find out more about Goldberg’s work online on her website or follow her on Twitter @b_goldberg.

Corina Milic reads, writes and edits for a living. She is the poetry editor at Canada’s funniest magazine that features a simian, The Feathertale Review. Monkeys don’t pay bills though, so she also works as an online editor and community manager at MSN.ca, Canada’s (legitimately) largest portal. She is currently trying to read every single book in her home. Track her progress here.

Iain Reid is the author of the critically acclaimed comic memoir One Bird’s Choice, which won the CBC Bookie Award for Best Non-fiction Book of the year and sold internationally. His second book, The Truth About Luck, will be published by House of Anansi Press in 2013. He writes regularly about books and writing for the National Post. Follow him at @reid_iain.

Janet Somerville teaches literature at Royal St. George’s College, a school for boys in Toronto’s Annex neighborhood where many of the authors who appear in her courses come to classes to talk about the writing life. A former PEN Canada board member and longtime volunteer, Somerville also curates an annual event called Get Caught Reading to benefit the Children’s Book Bank. She has poems published in Calling Cards: New Poetry from Caribbean/Canadian Women, tweets about books at both @janetsomerville and @TeenBoyLitCrit, and blogs about what she’s reading at Reading For The Joy of It.

Our bloggers are looking forward to the Festival, which begins October 18. For more information about our incredible lineup of authors and events, visit readings.org.

Emma Donoghue on writing, reading and love letters to elephants

© Nina Subin

The multi-talented Emma Donoghue, author of the bestselling Room, joined us for a Twitter chat with HarperCollins Canada this morning. Our favourite quote? On how long it took her to research her new short story collection, Astray, which spans four centuries:

“A decade and a half. I’m like your crazy aunt who never throws anything away.”

But she said a lot of other amazing things, too. If you missed the chat, here are some highlights:

[#Astraychat with Emma Donoghue” on Storify]

Welcome to the 33rd annual International Festival of Authors

By Jennifer Asselin
Team IFOA

Late nights and good reads. This is what the International Festival of Authors (IFOA) comes down to for me. After months of preparation, the 2012 IFOA is almost upon us and it is my pleasure to welcome you to our brand new blog. With social media and different online entities becoming so prevalent in the publishing world it’s no secret the IFOA needed to enter this market as well. There was a time, a few years ago, when a Festival blog did exist featuring content from one writer (now an award-winning author) sharing his experiences throughout the 11-day Festival. From there the Globe and Mail took the reins and became the Festival’s official bloggers. That brings us to today, when we felt the need to pick up where the previous blog left off and help bring you, the audience, a unique perspective on the Festival.

Throughout the next few weeks leading up to the Toronto Festival (a literary Festival known for bringing together the world’s best writers of contemporary literature to take part in a plethora of events including readings, interviews and round table discussions) you can expect to find a little bit of everything on the blog. From features like “Five Questions with…” to photos of past Festivals to participants’ own guest posts to entries from our Festival bloggers who will post about their own thoughts and experiences of attending events from October 18 to 28.

So please, bookmark the blog and keep checking back for new content. You can also visit readings.org for a full schedule of events and author bios, and of course, follow us on Twitter @IFOA. Be sure to use the hashtag #IFOA when discussing this year’s Festival.

With just four weeks to go before the Festival, take the time to get acquainted with all 190 participants. I have a feeling this is going to be a Festival to remember.

Happy reading,
Jennifer

Page 85 of 85« First...102030...8182838485